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Twitter Users React To New Ad Campaigns From Snapchat, Foursquare

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Two more of the Internet's most used social companies are taking big, new steps into advertisement.

Last weekend, SnapChat, the mobile app that allows users to send pictures and videos that can only be viewed for a few second before they are erased, introduced paid advertisements to the app. In a blog post about the launch, the company said quite clearly that they are introducing ads because “we need to make money.”

Furthermore, the company said they will not be using targeted ads, which they called “creepy.” One of the first ads was a short video for the upcoming, Universal Pictures-distributed horror film “Ouija.” Like other “snaps,” the video disappeared as soon as users watched it.

And last Monday, Foursquare, the local search and discovery service, launched its first ever ad campaign, with signs in subway cars, airports and city bike share hubs. The ads are introducing the company’s new catchphrase: “The new Foursquare learns what you like and and leads you to place you’ll love.” Each poster features two people with three, specific interests of each listed to the side.

To gauge the response to these new ad campaigns, Benzinga turned to another hub of online social activity (that has already begun capitalizing on ads): Twitter Inc (NYSE: TWTR).

Several people brought up the fact that Snapchat will be shying away from targeted ads, which has become standard for other social media presences that advertise.

Some responded to the blatant honesty of Snapchat's blog post:

While others did the math and were pretty excited:

Posted-In: Foursquare Mobile ads SnapChatCrowdsourcing Tech Media General

 

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