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Netflix: Buy The Disney Dip

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Netflix: Buy The Disney Dip

Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ: NFLX)'s stock was inching towards the $200 per share mark throughout July, but Walt Disney Co (NYSE: DIS)'s decision to end its relationship with Netflix as of 2019 has put a dent in Netflix's stock momentum.

After peaking at $191.50 in July, Netflix's stock closed on Tuesday at $168.50 but this has created a buying opportunity for Netflix's stock, Rosenblatt Securities' Alan Gould argued in a research report. Granted, the inability to continue showing Disney's content is "clearly a loss" and it would be a mistake to "diminish its importance." Also, the parting of ways could create corporate tensions between the two companies and could put to rest the possibility of Disney acquiring Netflix.

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But Netflix remains a behemoth in the online video streaming space and the company continues to build a "content moat," which it is able to amortize over its global audience — which also happens to be the largest of its kind in the space.

The streaming video company is expected to spend $15 billion per year on content in four years and $25 billion per year in 10 years, which may seem like a large number but would make it the lowest cost provider on a per subscriber basis, the analyst added. On top of that, Netflix has minimal distribution costs and this will continue moving forward as the company will act as its own producer, distributor and retailer of its content.

Bottom line, Netflix's recent sell-off is overblown and investors may consider buying on the dip.

Gould maintains a Buy rating and $200 price target.

Related Links:

Rosenblatt Raises Netflix Target To $200 After Quarter That Was 'Just Too Good'

Netflix To Capture ABC's Female Following With Rhimes Deal

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