Market Overview

Weekly Highlights: iPhone 6 Troubles, New MacBook Air Coming, Google IO And More

Nearly every major tech company held a conference in June. This week it was Google's (NASDAQ: GOOG) turn.

The search engine giant announced a number of Android-related developments, including another TV platform.

Speaking of TV, the Supreme Court put an end to Aereo after ruling that the company had violated the law. Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX) could be indirectly affected by the aftermath.

Apple's (NASDAQ: AAPL) TV initiative was nowhere to be found this week, but there were new rumors surrounding the iPhone 6 and 12-inch MacBook Air.

Elsewhere in the tech space, Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) dodged a bullet that threatened to deflate its Prime Air delivery service.

Disclosure: At the time of this writing, Louis Bedigian had no position in the equities mentioned in this report.

Posted-In: Aereo Amazon Android Auto Android TVNews Rumors Success Stories Tech Best of Benzinga

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    Google Brought New Concepts To Google IO

    Google Brought New Concepts To Google IO

    Google's annual conference featured a plethora of anticipated announcements, including Android TV, Android Auto and more information regarding Android Wear.

    Some of the more surprising announcements (such as a low-cost cardboard VR headset) were overshadowed by the media hoopla for wearable technology.

    None of these products or services may have what it takes to break new ground. But they reinforced the message that Google is always planning for the next big thing -- even if it doesn't know what it is yet.

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    Apple's iPhone 6 Hit A Minor Snag

    Apple's iPhone 6 Hit A Minor Snag

    Apple is expected to release a larger, 4.7-inch iPhone in September or October.

    However, that device will never make it to retail if Apple can't find a proper manufacturing partner.

    The company has reportedly rejected a defective, 4.7-inch chassis produced by Catcher.

    To make up for this loss, Apple has apparently placed additional orders with Jabil Circuit and Foxconn.

    It is not yet known if this will impact how many units Apple will ship at launch.

    Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
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    Google Could Team With HTC For Big Tablet

    Google Could Team With HTC For Big Tablet

    Most consumers seem to be content with a seven- or 10-inch tablet.

    HTC and Google might have a solution for those who aren't: an 8.9-inch tablet.

    This mysterious, unnamed tablet was expected to be unveiled at Google's developer conference. That didn't happen, but if the leaked images are any indication, an announcement should be forthcoming.

    Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
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    Apple's 12-Inch MacBook Air Inched Closer To Reality

    Apple's 12-Inch MacBook Air Inched Closer To Reality

    Apple recently upgraded the MacBook Air and reduced its price by $100.

    This could be a defensive tactic designed to prevent a sales decline.

    But what if the company simply wanted to sell a bunch of old MacBooks before releasing an entirely new model?

    If the rumors are true, Apple will release a 12-inch MacBook Air this fall. Mass production is expected to start in the third quarter.

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    Chromebook Market Share Could Hit 5%

    Chromebook Market Share Could Hit 5%

    There have been a lot of stories written about the recalls and lackluster sales of Chromebook computers.

    Regardless, these machines could still become very popular.

    A new report claims that Chromebook's market share could reach four to five percent in 2014.

    The report does not specify if this is only for the year (which is likely) or if it accounts for the entire lifetime share of the notebook market.

    Either way, the increase would represent a big win for Google's notebook platform.

    Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
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    Supreme Court Ruled Against Warrantless Cell Phone Searches

    Supreme Court Ruled Against Warrantless Cell Phone Searches

    The days of warrant-less cell phone searches might finally be over.

    This week the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that police must obtain a warrant before they can search a suspect's cell phone.

    The New York Times assumes that this ruling also applies to tablets and laptops. But while those items are not carried as frequently, consumers almost always have a phone in their pocket.

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    The Supreme Court Also Ruled Against Aereo…

    The Supreme Court Also Ruled Against Aereo…

    This was a big, technology-fueled week for the Supreme Court.

    The high court ruled against Aereo (a service that allows consumers to stream live TV for a fee), saying that it violated the Copyright Act of 1976.

    Aereo differs from other pay-TV companies in that it doesn't pay broadcasters for the right to stream live content.

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    …And It Could Be Bad For Netflix

    …And It Could Be Bad For Netflix

    The Supreme Court's decision might not sound like it has anything to do with Netflix, but Albert Fried & Company analyst Rich Tullo said otherwise.

    "Netflix is at a disadvantage because of this for two reasons," Tullo told Benzinga. "The first reason is more competition for their content, because they are in competition with syndicated TV for content."

    Aereo could have theoretically reduced the value of syndication rights, thereby making old shows less expensive for Netflix to acquire.

    Tullo also believed that Netflix could have benefited from Aereo's ability to help consumers cut the cord. With Aereo, consumers may have needed Netflix to fill the pay-TV void. Without Aereo, consumers must still subscribe to cable for live TV.

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    Amazon's Prime Air Dodge An FAA Bullet

    Amazon's Prime Air Dodge An FAA Bullet

    Amazon's Prime Air nearly hit a snag this week.

    The service was thought to have been banned after the Federal Aviation Administration after announced its rules for model aircrafts.

    Those rules only applied to hobbyists, however -- not commercial entities like Amazon.

    Note: This drone is not the one Amazon plans to use with its delivery service.

    Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
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