Market Overview

Two Soldiers Prescribed 54 Drugs: Military Mental Health "Treatment" Becomes Frankenpharmacy

Share:

The mental health watchdog Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR) announces the second in a four-part series by journalist Kelly Patricia O'Meara exploring the epidemic of suicides in the military and the correlation to dramatic increases in psychiatric drug prescriptions to treat the emotional scars of battle. The second installment covers psycho-pharma's disastrous chemical experimentation within the military ending in sudden unexplained deaths, including those of Marine corporal Andrew White and Senior Airman Anthony Mena who were prescribed a total of 54 drugs between them.

Los Angeles, California (PRWEB) October 31, 2012

By Kelly Patricia O'Meara, for the Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR)

"The devastating adverse effects mind-altering psychiatric drugs may be having on the nation's military troops are best summed up by Mary Shelley's Dr. Frankenstein, writing 'nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.'

"Just as the fictional character, Dr. Frankenstein, turned to experiments in the laboratory to create life with fantastically horrific results, the psychiatric community, along with its pharmaceutical sidekicks, has turned to modern day chemical concoctions to alter the human mind. The result is what many believe is a growing number of equally hideous results culminating in senseless deaths, tormented lives and grief-stricken families.

"The nation's military troops are taking their lives at record numbers and seemingly healthy soldiers are dying from sudden unexplained deaths. That's a fact. The data are clear, yet, despite growing evidence pointing to the enemy among us, the monstrous psycho-pharmacological experiment continues."

In the second installment of a four-part series, O'Meara examines the sudden unexplained deaths within the military tied to psychiatric drug use, including two soldiers who between them, were prescribed a whopping 54 drugs including Seroquel, Effexor, Paxil, Prozac, Remeron, Wellbutrin, Xanax, Zoloft, Ativan, Celexa, Cymbalta, Depakote, Haldol, Klonopin, Lexapro, Lithium, Lunesta, Compazine, Desyrel, Trileptal and Valium.

  • Marine corporal Andrew White, was a healthy 23-year-old, gung-ho Marine returning from a nine-month tour in Iraq, who, like so many of his brothers in arms, suffered from the seemingly normal stresses of war - insomnia, nightmares and restlessness. The young corporal turned to the military's mental health system for help. But eleven months after beginning his first cocktail of mind-altering psychiatric drugs, he died in his sleep from what the medical examiner ruled an "accidental overdose of medication." Since taking his first multi-drug cocktail to the date of his death, White had been prescribed no less than nineteen different drugs with many at ever-increasing dosages.
Twenty-three -year old Anthony (Tony) Mena had completed two tours in Iraq as part of Kirtland Air Force Base's 377th Security Forces Squadron. Like so many others returning from combat, Mena suffered from insomnia, restlessness and nightmares—and like Andrew White, became a victim of the military's mental health mind-altering multi-drug approach to treatment. Between January of 2008 and his death in July 2009, Mena had been prescribed no less than 35 prescription drugs, including numerous antidepressants, pain killers, tranquilizers and muscle relaxers.

</ul>

O'Meara details how these two men exemplify the ever-increasing numbers of young, seemingly healthy soldiers who survived the horrors of war only to return home to fight, and lose, their toughest battle. They are among a growing list of sudden deaths among military personnel, which many believe is due to sudden cardiac arrest brought on by the drug cocktails being prescribed. Fred Baughman Jr., MD, who has been researching these questionable deaths, believes that the few that are known are just the "tip of the iceberg."

Kelly Patricia O'Meara is a book author and former award winning investigative reporter for the Washington Times, Insight Magazine. Prior to working as an investigative journalist, O'Meara spent sixteen years on Capitol Hill as a congressional staffer to four Members of Congress. She holds a B.S. in Political Science from the University of Maryland.

Read the full article here.

Read the previous article, Psychiatric Drugs & War: A Suicide Mission here.

Visit CCHR's Psychiatric Drug Side Effects database, comprising summaries of all international drug regulatory warnings, studies, and more than 470,000 adverse reaction reports filed with the US FDA.

CCHR is a non-profit, non-political, non-religious mental health watchdog. Its mission is to eradicate abuses committed under the guise of mental health and enact patient and consumer protections. CCHR has helped to enact more than 150 laws protecting individuals from abusive or coercive mental health practices.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/10/prweb10075838.htm

View Comments and Join the Discussion!