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Trimega launches DNA relationship testing services

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Manchester-based Trimega Laboratories, a leading provider of drug and alcohol testing services, is pleased to announce the launch of a new service in DNA relationship testing. Trimega will provide key expertise to the UK courts in cases of contested parentage or complex relationship testing.

Manchester, United Kingdom (PRWEB UK) 29 October 2012

Manchester-based Trimega Laboratories, a leading provider of drug and alcohol testing services, is pleased to announce the launch of a new service in DNA relationship testing. Trimega will provide key expertise to the UK courts in cases of contested parentage or complex relationship testing.

Using a simple swabbing technique, representatives of Trimega will collect samples of cells from a candidate's cheek. These samples will be passed through a chain of custody to the laboratory of partner Eurofins Medigenomix in Germany. The testing facility is accredited to ISO 9001 and ISO 17025 levels. Trimega will provide two types of test: paternity testing and complex relationship testing.
Douglas MacSween, general manager of Trimega Laboratories, said, “We are delighted to have expanded the services we offer to our clients to include DNA testing of such a high standard. We believe this is an invaluable expansion of our services and further cements our place as a leading provider of complex testing services to the courts of the United Kingdom.”

DNA testing can only answer the question of biological relationship to a degree of probability – relations are only expected to share some aspects of their DNA profiles and subtle changes in the DNA as a result of genetic mutation will always be a factor – but the degree of probability can be incredibly high, accurate to 99% for inclusion and 100% accurate in excluding someone who is not the biological father of an individual. For this reason, courts have accepted these tests as the standard for determining if a person is directly related to another individual and the technology used is well established.
In a paternity test, DNA samples are taken from the child, its mother and the person who may be the child's father. Since everyone inherits half their DNA from each parent, the child's DNA profile can be compared to the mother's, and those DNA types (known as alleles) inherited from her can be identified. The remaining alleles must have been inherited from the child's father. By comparing those alleles, it is possible to see if they match the corresponding alleles in the alleged father's profile. A high degree of similarity in these remaining alleles can indicate a strong likelihood that the person is the child's father.
When comparing the alleles of the child and the possible father, bio-statistical analysis is conducted. This takes into account how common or rare alleles are in the wider population. Two possible relatives having a rarer allele in common provides more support for the biological relationship.

Complex relationship testing seeks to establish if a more distant biological relationship exists between two individuals. Complex relationship testing examines 12 additional alleles beyond the 16 examined in paternity tests. Complex relationship testing can have an accuracy rate of 95% for inclusion, although exclusion cannot be readily established. Complex relationship testing can be used to establish a biological relationship between an individual and a grandparent, aunt or uncle, sibling, half sibling or first cousin. It is also possible to test the Y-chromosome or mitochondrial DNA to see if there is any relationship along the paternal or maternal lines.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/10/prweb10067701.htm

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