Billionaire Charlie Munger Reveals The Reason Berkshire Hathaway Is Sitting On $88 Billion in Cash

The S&P 500 dipped by 19% in 2022, but stocks still don’t seem cheap to Charlie Munger, Warren Buffett’s billionaire partner at Berkshire Hathaway.

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“In my whole adult life, I have never hoarded cash, waiting for better conditions,” Munger said in an interview in late 2022. “I’ve just invested in the best thing I could find.”

Yet he acknowledged that Berkshire Hathaway is sitting on billions of dollars in cash. The reason isn’t that Buffett and Munger think they can wait for stocks to get even cheaper — the wager known as “timing the market.” 

Instead, Munger said bluntly that Berkshire isn’t buying anything “because there’s nothing we can stand buying.” 

It’s an amazing statement. Even with a stock market downturn that would presumably result in dozens or hundreds of stocks trading on sale, at bargain-level prices, the world’s most famous value investors aren’t remotely tempted to dive in. 

Berkshire Hathaway — and every other major name in finance — is somewhat limited in what it can do. By law, major financial institutions and billionaire investors can’t buy more than 5% of a company without submitting a 13-D filing as a beneficial owner to the Securities and Exchange Commission and all of the headaches that come with it. 

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This essentially shuts Buffett out of the world of microcap investing — unless Berkshire Hathaway decides to jump through those regulatory hoops. And even if the company chose to do so, and uncovered a 10 times opportunity, the upside would be barely noticeable to Berkshire Hathaway. If a $2 million stake turned into $20 million, that wouldn’t move the needle for a company that collects hundreds of millions of dollars in dividends each year from its stake in Coca-Cola alone. 

But for ordinary investors, it’s a different story. The world of startup investing — legally closed to everyday investors for decades — is now open to the masses.

Companies like StartEngine, for example, allow everyday investors to invest small amounts in high-growth startups potentially capitalizing on the high-risk, high-reward nature of startup investing. Investors can invest small amounts in a diverse number of startups, and even one big win can be a substantial boost to someones portfolio. With hundreds of startups on these equity crowdfunding portals for investors to invest in, including StartEngine itself, investors can choose from some of the top startups in the country backed by the worlds best venture capitalists.

See more on startup investing from Benzinga.

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