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Net Neutrality Ruling Could Have A Ripple Effect

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Net Neutrality Ruling Could Have A Ripple Effect
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The Federal Communications Commission's decision to regulate the internet as a public utility could become a precedent used by international leaders looking to create their own policies to protect net neutrality.

On Tuesday, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is set to deliver the keynote address at the Mobile World Congress, kicking off a summit that is likely to center on how to effectively regulate the growing industry.

Europe Hopes To Play Catch-Up

European policymakers have heavily regulated the region's networks, but with a focus on creating competition between providers rather than net neutrality.

Luigi Gambardella, the former European Telecommunications Network Operators' Association Chairman, has said the lack of regulation in the U.S. has allowed American providers to develop more advanced broadband networks, but that the FCC's ruling could offer European providers a chance to play catch up.

Google Under Fire

While Google, Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG) initially led the net neutrality crusade, the company has been appealing to U.S. lawmakers to have some of the language in the FCC's ruling changed.

Google executives are worried that the way the commission describes content companies' relationships could add fuel to an already heated battle with European regulators.

The European Commission is working to create a streamlined policy that governs internet activity across the entire region in order to make it easier for tech companies to break into the industry.

However, among those guidelines are proposed taxes and regulations on big name corporations like Google and Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ: FB) in order to protect the interests of smaller websites.

The Federal Communications Commission's decision to regulate the internet as a public utility could become a precedent used by international leaders looking to create their own policies to protect net neutrality.

On Tuesday, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is set to deliver the keynote address at the Mobile World Congress, kicking off a summit that is likely to center on how to effectively regulate the growing industry.

Europe Hopes To Play Catch-Up

European policymakers have heavily regulated the region's networks, but with a focus on creating competition between providers rather than net neutrality.

Luigi Gambardella, the former European Telecommunications Network Operators' Association Chairman, has said the lack of regulation in the U.S. has allowed American providers to develop more advanced broadband networks, but that the FCC's ruling could offer European providers a chance to play catch up.

Related Link: Broadband Providers Say Government Intervention Is Not The Answer In Net Neutrality

Google Under Fire

While Google Inc (NASDAQ: GOOGL) initially led the net neutrality crusade, the company has been appealing to U.S. lawmakers to have some of the language in the FCC's ruling changed.

Google executives are worried that the way the commission describes content companies' relationships could add fuel to an already heated battle with European regulators.

The European Commission is working to create a streamlined policy that governs internet activity across the entire region in order to make it easier for tech companies to break into the industry.

However, among those guidelines are proposed taxes and regulations on big name corporations like Google and Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ: FB) in order to protect the interests of smaller websites.

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