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Coronavirus Update: States With Most and Fewest New COVID-19 Cases in July 2020

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Arizona leads the nation with 502 new COVID-19 cases per million people

How long do Americans think it will take to get a coronavirus vaccine?

Each week, our Benzinga data team releases nationally sampled consumer sentiment survey data related to the impact coronavirus has had on consumer sentiment and the national economy. This week, our team asked American adults how they would describe the way most Americans have handled COVID-19 and how long they feel it would take before a coronavirus vaccine would be made available to the general public.

We surveyed over 650 U.S. adults 18 or older on whether they believe a vaccine will be ready in 2020 or is more likely to be ready for distribution in 2021 or 2022.

Here are the highlights from this week’s study.

Key Findings from the Study

Rankings from this week’s study were generated from data provided by both United States of Care and Vital Strategies. Benzinga analyzed the data to find the states reporting the most and fewest new daily COVID-19 cases in July 2020.

We learned Arizona, Louisiana and Texas are the 3 states where daily total COVID-19 cases are highest. Arizona is the only state where new coronavirus cases exceed 500 cases per million people in the month of July. The 10 states with the most daily new COVID-19 cases are ranked below.

Vermont, Hawaii and West Virginia are the 3 states where daily total COVID-19 cases are lowest. Hawaii and Vermont have seen just 5 new coronavirus cases per million people during the month of July. The 10 states with the fewest new coronavirus cases are ranked below.

States With Most Daily New COVID-19 Cases (July 2020)

  • 1: Arizona: 502 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 2: Louisiana: 416 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 3: Texas: 346 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 4: Florida: 342 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 5: Mississippi: 322 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 6: Georgia: 321 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 7: Nevada: 284 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 8: Oklahoma: 217 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 9: Tennessee: 199 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 10: South Carolina: 189 new COVID-19 cases per million people

States With Fewest Daily New COVID-19 Cases (July 2020)

  • 41: Colorado: 30 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 42: New Jersey: 30 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 43: New York: 30 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 44: Massachusetts: 29 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 45: Connecticut: 16 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 46: Maine: 13 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 47: New Hampshire: 13 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 48: West Virginia: 11 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 49: Hawaii: 5 new COVID-19 cases per million people
  • 50: Vermont: 5 new COVID-19 cases per million people

Risk Perception of COVID-19

If general, how would you describe the way most Americans are handling COVID-19?58.8% say most are underestimating the risks.12.4% say most are behaving appropriately.16.9% say most are overreacting to the risks.11.9% are unsure.
Survey sample size: N=621

Overall, 60% of American adults told us most of their fellow citizens are underestimating the risks of COVID-19. Seventeen percent said most of their fellow citizens are overreacting to the risks of COVID-19. 

Timetable for a Vaccine

How long do you think it will be before we have a coronavirus vaccine?12.1% say in 2020.68.1% say in 2021.19.8% say in 2022 or later.
Survey sample size: N=561

Americans believe there will be no coronavirus vaccine before the end of the year. 

Only 12% of Americans told us they believe there will be a coronavirus vaccine by the end of 2020. Eighty-eight percent said they presume a vaccine will be completed in 2021 or later.

Survey Methodology 

This study was conducted by Benzinga between July 6 and 7 and included the responses of a diverse population of American adults 18 or older. The study reflects the results from over 650 American adults on their thoughts and views pertaining to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The United States population estimates base is courtesy of Census.gov. The data to rank the new daily COVID cases is courtesy of covidexitstrategy.org.

Please contact henrykhederian@benzinga.com with questions or to schedule a phone or video interview with our team.