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How Musicians Can Make Money From Home During COVID-19

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You’ve heard about Billboard 100 concerts getting cancelled during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.  Thousands of local and regional musical artists are also impacted by the pandemic. 

In an effort to support the music industry, industry website Audio Assemble has announced home concert events to give musicians a chance to showcase their talents. It’s called PLUGGED IN, and it’s an outstanding opportunity to earn lost income from coronavirus-related gig cancellations. 

What is Audio Assemble?

Audio Assemble, founded in 2008, was created so that people can easily and quickly learn how to use Pro Tools recording software. The site helps musicians learn how to more effectively edit studio recordings and improve overall music production skills. Audio Assemble’s goals are to:

  1. Help all levels of musicians understand their industry better.
  2. Educate musicians and producers on the best types of equipment to use.
  3. Provide a free avenue of information directly relevant to musicians’ career and passion.

Artists with the following criteria can submit applications to be featured in PLUGGED IN:

  • You must be directly impacted due to the coronavirus outbreak.
  • You depend on gig income from public live performances or house concerts.
  • Have the ability to live stream and record a 20-30 minute set.
  • Be willing to work with PLUGGED IN‘s team.

Find the full list of cash prizes and deadlines for PLUGGED IN.

Musicians know that nothing, including the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, can get in the way of supporting the spirit of their industry and fellow musicians. 

Whether you sing, write songs or play an instrument, you know how valuable live entertainment is for the heart, soul and creative drive of the world. With the coronavirus wreaking havoc on the gig economy, you may feel your world has been put on an abrupt pause.

Everything from Billboard 100 Concerts to local house shows are on an indefinite hiatus thanks to the global spread of COVID-19.

While we’re planning for today and everything ahead, know that musicians have a myriad of ways to make money working remotely during the coronavirus pandemic.

Live music is a priceless and iconic feature of world entertainment and few things strike a chord with Americans more than the work you do. The following are ways musicians can earn money from home during the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak.

Host An Instagram or YouTube Live Concert 

Like you, your listener-base is likely struggling to find ways to fill their free time. What’s a fun way to keep in touch with your fans while giving yourself some earning potential? Consider hosting an Instagram concert. 

As a vast majority of Americans look for fun things to do during quarantine, ask yourself why you can’t be a source of good vibes and positive energy for others. 

Hosting an Instagram concert is as simple as propping your phone or recording device onto a tripod, and hitting “record’ within Instagram’s “Live” feature.

While your fans are jamming out to you and any band members you may have, don’t forget to include a donation link in your livestream to GoFundMe, Kindly, or CrowdFire. 

If you’d rather have donations go directly to charity, feel free to add up a URL to your charity of choice in your livestream! 

Transcribe Audio

You’ve got the recording equipment, and perhaps a home studio. Why not put your second-to-none listening ear to use and transcribe audio files?

Websites like UpWork are flush with opportunities to transcribe audio from online resources like podcasts. While many audio transcriptionists possess only a computer and high speed internet connection, as a musician you likely have high-end recording and transcription software to produce top-notch results for clients.

Transcribing audio gives you the opportunity to not only earn some cash during the coronavirus pandemic, but also earn the satisfaction of building resources for students and the eldery who are hearing challenged.

A vast majority of work in the audio transcription world is paid by the “audio hour”. What’s that even mean? Well, audio hours are transcription-speak for audio file length. The length of the piece of audio you are transcribing is the length of time you are paid for. 

So while many contractors are paid by the hour, you’ll get paid to transcribe audio based on the length of the file alone.

Narrate Audiobooks

Musicians like yourself are often owners of world-class microphones and audio editing software. Why not take advantage of your studio equipment to work as a freelance audiobook narrator?
You’ve been on the big stage. You’ve been under the bright lights. So, what if we told you an entire industry needs your voice and needs it right now? 

That’s right, budding and experienced narrators can capitalize on the nationwide demand for audiobooks by lending their voice to publishers in need.

Although narrating audiobooks is a creative and safe way to earn some extra cash during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, it’s grueling! According to backstage.com, 100,000 words read aloud in-studio generally sums to 22 hours of recording time.   

You may be best suited for audiobook gigs if you have acting, singing and commentating experience. With the emergence of audiobook merchants like Audible, authors are in constant need of distributing their latest and greatest novellas in sound form.

Rock On

While you’re in quarantine and unable to perform your usual schedule of gigs, we encourage you and your friends in the industry to make use of your previous creative endeavors, recording  equipment and softwares you have handy to make some extra cash! 

When looking for some extra cash, check out the latest news pertaining to coronavirus stimulus checks orchestrated by the US Government.

Don’t forget: our team is covering every angle of how the coronavirus impacts the financial world. For daily updates, click here to sign up for our coronavirus newsletter.

While the music industry has been especially hard hit by COVID-19, our Benzinga family always reminds readers that we’re all in this together. We not only hope you take advantage of these opportunities we’ve covered here, but want you to stay happy and healthy during these uncertain economic and social times.