BioSig Expands in Electrophysiology with St. Elizabeth's Medical Center Evaluation

BioSig Expands in Electrophysiology with St. Elizabeth's Medical Center Evaluation

 

The following post was written and/or published as a collaboration between Benzinga’s in-house sponsored content team and a financial partner of Benzinga.

Increasing its ever-growing presence in the cardiac electrophysiology space, BioSig Technologies BSGM will be installing one of its new PURE EP systems in St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in Boston for evaluation.

Physiological pacing procedures are meant to mimic the heart’s normal contraction to have markedly improved clinical and hemodynamic benefits. Under the guidance of Michael Orlov M.D., this study evaluation assesses the effectiveness of PURE EP in these types of procedures.

PURE EP, a signal processing platform that helps electrophysiologists see the heart in real-time, is meant to provide a more accurate and effective image of what is going on in the body so that better treatment options are chosen. With PURE EP, BioSig hopes to address heart conditions that millions suffer from, including atrial fibrillation (AFib). 

Cardiac Care Gets a Boost

Unfortunately, many cardiac issues, including AFib, are currently treated with outdated and expensive medical equipment, possibly leading to misdiagnosis, ineffective solutions, and lengthened treatment protocols. BioSig hopes to provide more information with their PURE EP product, extracting raw data from signals so that every patient has the most accurate real-time image of their heart available. 

More than 1,300 patient cases have been conducted with the PURE EP system by 60 physicians in 12 states with positive outcomes. 

This relationship marks the company’s 13th hospital partnership, including a 10-year partnership with the Mayo Clinic. Its research program is headed by Samuel J. Asirvatham, M.D, vice-chair of Innovation and Medical Director of the Electrophysiology Laboratory. 

PURE EP is part of bioelectronic medicine, a growing field of healthcare that uses electronic signals to diagnose and determine a treatment course for a disease. Researchers have begun to study bioelectronic medicine in a variety of areas, including neurology, diabetes, and cancer. Currently, this market represents about $22.6 billion, and by some accounts is looking to hover around $60 billion in 2029. 

Stethoscope Meets Software

These new developments, however, aren’t just attracting those in the hospital industry. Companies like Johnson & Johnson JNJ, Verily Life Sciences (a subsidiary of Alphabet GOOGL, and Medtronic MDT have all expressed interest in bioelectronic medicine successes, pointing to a promising future for the intersection of the healthcare and technology industries.

Not only did BioSig recently complete and present data for its first clinical trial, but it has also begun to focus on a commercial launch of the PURE EP product in places like the Mayo Clinic and St. David’s Center. 

BioSig hopes to bridge the gap between the current standard of care in the cardiac space so that patients can be seen, heard, and accurately treated for their ailments. 

 

The preceding post was written and/or published as a collaboration between Benzinga’s in-house sponsored content team and a financial partner of Benzinga. Although the piece is not and should not be construed as editorial content, the sponsored content team works to ensure that any and all information contained within is true and accurate to the best of their knowledge and research. This content is for informational purposes only and not intended to be investing advice.

 

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