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How Employees Can Be A Threat To Cloud Security

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The ability to work remotely has quickly become a benefit offered by most companies. In fact, last year 43 percent of Americans said they had spent some time working remotely. But what does this mean for cloud security? It's important for organizations to recognize how employees can jeopardize cloud security, and also how they can protect information in the cloud. Let's review three ways employees are the biggest threats to cloud security.

Use of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)

With the advent of BYOD, employees can find themselves working from any location, without being tethered to the office desk. While this has led to increased efficiency and productivity, it can also introduce security risks.

As an example, an employee who stores sensitive company information on their personal device may not have the necessary security software to protect that information. A lost or misplaced device could result in a massive data leak. A user who accesses a sensitive data in a cloud application while connected to an unsecured public Wi-Fi on their personal device can put the security of that data in jeopardy. Given the fact that by 2020 there will be 200 billion smart objects, the BYOD trend is unlikely to go in reverse.

Information technology has always had to deal with hackers, but remote work using a personal device adds pressure to keep up with the changing cyber security landscape. For this reason, it’s important that organizations ensure that the proper security software is installed on every employee’s personal device if that device will be used for work. In addition, access policies will need to implement the limits of use of the personal device from accessing certain types of data in cloud services.

Lack of Awareness

Staff education is a good way to minimize cloud security threat, and education should focus on best practices for network security. Every employee isn't going to be information technology savvy, so training should be mandatory. If you think about it, social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn are trendy today, but social media sites are also popular among cyber attackers, which jeopardize cloud security. When employees click on the links to these sites, they probably open your cyber security system to hackers.

Internal Complexities

A high number of security breaches in a company are caused by the action of someone in the company more often than we know. Sometimes, those actions are malicious. A 2016 Cybersecurity Intelligence Index report by IBM found that 60 percent of all company attacks were internal. And, even more surprisingly, three-quarters of the attacks were malicious. This is why backgrounds checks are necessary. They provide previous employment history and involvement in any criminal activities.

Cybersecurity problems are everywhere, and most technology is vulnerable, which makes it easy to hack. Healthcare, financial, and manufacturing services are the top industries under attack, but cloud security software tools or services like cloud access security brokers (CASB), can act as a security policy enforcement point, placed between cloud service customer and cloud service provider to secure the use of the cloud service and the data uploaded to it.

CASBs go beyond a firewall or a proxy and allow you to see right into an employee's cloud application usage. They provide visibility and audit-level logging or alerts to assist with post-incident forensic investigations. They also connect with existing security incident and event management (SIEM) tools via syslog and API integration.

The demand for flexibility in the workforce increases the risk to company cyber security, so as cloud based resources are accessed, going beyond your information technology system will prove to be beneficial. Cloud applications are here to stay and cloud access security brokers can address cloud security concerns.

Posted-In: contributorGeneral

 

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