Market Overview

APSP Urges Owners and Operators of Pools & Spas to Prepare for Upcoming ADA Deadline

The Association of Pool & Spa Professionals (APSP) reminds its members and other members of the aquatic community of the upcoming January 31, 2013 deadline for existing pool and spa compliance with sections 242 and 1009 of the 2010 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design.

Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) January 02, 2013

The Association of Pool & Spa Professionals (APSP) reminds its members and other members of the aquatic community of the upcoming January 31, 2013 deadline for existing pool and spa compliance with sections 242 and 1009 of the 2010 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design. Pools built or renovated since March 15, 2012 are currently required to meet the ADA requirements, but per the Department of Justice final rule published on May 21, 2012, the compliance date for existing pools and spas was extended.

The APSP urges facility operators and owners of pools and spas that fall under the ADA requirements to prepare for this upcoming deadline. “The first step would be to work with a pool professional to provide a barrier removal analysis which is simply an audit of a facility to determine if the facility falls under ADA jurisdiction and what elements within the facility would need to be modified to provide access for people with disabilities,” said Jennifer Hatfield, APSP director of government relations. “In the case of a swimming pool, once a facility has been determined to be subject to ADA regulations, the pools should be identified as to the type and size to determine what type of access will be required.”

Hatfield noted that if under the barrier removal analysis it is determined that a facility does fall under the ADA, what follows is an implementation plan, beginning with a listing of all barrier removal issues and a determination if the required modifications are readily achievable. If it is not readily achievable to make the barrier removal modifications, the reason for this determination should be clearly presented as part of the plan. The selected means of access should be identified. If the means of access already exists, it should be noted that it conforms to the regulations. If the means of access needs to be ordered, this also should be noted, along with a timetable for issuing the order and expected installation date.

“The APSP has and continues to support the Accessibility Standards and the goal of ensuring access by persons with disabilities in order for them to utilize pools and spas,” Hatfield added. “We've been following this issue for years and have developed information to help members reach compliance.”

To access information on the ADA requirements for pools and spas, including the DOJ's Technical Assistance Document, the ADA's 2010 Accessibility Standards, and other online tools including the APSP FAQs and a webinar on ADA requirements, visit APSP.org/ADA. For more information about the ADA as it relates to pools and spas, visit ADA.gov.

About APSP

The Association of Pool & Spa Professionals (APSP) is the world's oldest and largest association representing swimming pool, hot tub, and spa manufacturers, distributors, manufacturers' agents, designers, builders, installers, suppliers, retailers, and service professionals. Dedicated to the growth and development of its members' businesses and to promoting the enjoyment and safety of pools and spas, APSP offers a range of services, from professional development to advancing key legislation and regulation at the federal and local levels, to consumer outreach and public safety. APSP is the only industry organization recognized by the American National Standards Institute to develop and promote national standards for pools, hot tubs, and spas. For more information, visit APSP.org.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/1/prweb10286852.htm

 

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