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Expanding Recall of Sunland Peanut Butter Products Being Investigated by Starr, Austen & Miller

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Scott Starr, of the Indiana law firm of Starr, Austen & Miller, LLP, announced today that the firm is investigating the recall of peanut related products originating from the New Mexico production plant of Sunland Inc. due to possible salmonella contamination.

Indianapolis, IN (PRWEB) October 29, 2012

Scott Starr, of the Indiana law firm of Starr, Austen & Miller, LLP, announced today that the firm is investigating the recall of peanut related products originating from the New Mexico production plant of Sunland Inc. due to possible salmonella contamination.

In September the FDA issued a recall notice specifically linked to Trader Joe Peanut Butter, due to concerns over possible salmonella contamination. Trader Joe Peanut Butter is manufactured by Sunland Inc., in a production facility in Portales, New Mexico.     Since that initial FDA investigation began the presence of salmonella bacteria has been confirmed both in Trader Joe Peanut Butter and in other areas of the manufacturing line of the Sunland plant. More at: http://www.wfaa.com/news/health/kids-doctor/172483961.html

The confirmation of the presence of this life threatening bacteria within the product facility has led to a widened recall of all nut and seed related products produced at the plant. Therefore, this recall has now greatly expanded far beyond Trader Joe Peanut Butter to presently include 240 products from a variety of commercial lines that were either wholly produced at the New Mexico plant or had major ingredients, mostly nut or seeds, processed at the facility.

Among the major brands impacted are:

  •     Trader Joe Peanut Butter (sold through Trader Joe's)
  •     Archer Farmers Peanut Butter and other nut spreads (sold through Target)
  •     Cadia All Natural Peanut Butter
  •     Fresh and Easy Peanut Butter
  •     Harry and David nut spreads
  •     Natural Valley Peanut Butter
  •     Serious Food Silly Prices Peanut Butter and other nut spreads
  •     Sprouts Peanut Butter and other nut spreads
  •     Sun Harvest Peanut Butter and other nut spreads; and
  •     Sunland Peanut Butter and other nut spreads.

The list of non-peanut butter items that contain ingredients from the contaminated facility include a variety of cookies and ice creams that contain possibly contaminated nut or seeds from the plant. These items have been distributed through a variety of high profile chain stores including Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, Target and Stop and Shop.

A complete and up to date list of all these recalled products may be found at the FDA main cite: http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/CORENetwork/ucm320413.htm.

The recall focuses on items shelf-marked between May 1 and September 24, 2012. Already 39 individuals from 19 states have become infected with the salmonella bacteria linked to this outbreak, so if you have any products falling within the context of the recall you are advised to dispose of them immediately, according to the FDA. Read more here: http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/CORENetwork/ucm320413.htm.

Reports from food safety experts indicate that traditionally peanut butter is a low contamination vector for salmonella due to the roasting process that usually kills the bacteria. Given this, the outbreak's most logical origins are centered on inadequate cooking or later exposure in the manufacturing process.

Scott Starr, who is a partner of Starr, Austen & Miller, has stated, “We are alarmed at how many items and brands have had to be recalled because of this contamination, especially since this is a type of food often consumed by young children, who are then often at increased risk of problems due to such infections. If you feel you or your child have been harmed by food contaminated in this outbreak, please seek medical attention right away.”

He further stated, “Due to the nature of food poisoning claims, most claims hinge on establishing the causal link between the victim's illness and the infected food. If you have suffered from a salmonella infection and believe it may have been linked to one of the recalled food items make sure your physician does appropriate tests, preferably before any antibiotics are administered, to determine what particular food borne pathogen is responsible for your symptoms. In addition, have your physician report the specifics of your case to the local health department to assess if it is part of a larger regional outbreak.”    

Finally, Starr explained, “with for food poisoning cases, you must prove three critical elements, the food was contaminated, causation and damages. Taking these proactive steps when seeking medical attention, along with contacting knowledgeable counsel, can mean the difference between proving your case, and never getting anyone to take responsibility for the damages caused to your health and well-being through no fault of your own.”

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/10/prweb10061585.htm

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