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Raw Orange Blossom Honey From The Mohawk Valley Trading Company is Back in Stock

Raw Orange Blossom Honey is back in stock and available in 1lb glass jars for $10.00 each at the Mohawk Valley Trading Company. This is raw honey; it has not been heated, filtered, blended or processed. All of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals and aromatics are in the same condition as they were in the hive.

Lakeland, FL (PRWEB) October 03, 2012

Raw Orange Blossom Honey is back in stock and available in 1lb glass jars for $10.00 each at the Mohawk Valley Trading Company. This is raw honey; it has not been heated, filtered, blended or processed. All of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals and aromatics are in the same condition as they were in the hive.

Mohawk Valley Trading Company Raw Orange Blossom Honey is derived mainly from the nectar of Ambersweet, Hamlin, Navel, Red Navel, Parson Brown, Pineapple, Temple and Valencia orange blossoms. It is this wide variety of orange blossoms that gives this honey its unique and extraordinary flavor.

Throughout history, orange blossoms have been used in other contexts excluding honey. A popular use of orange blossoms was in Victorian bridal bouquets, headpieces, or dresses. This was done based on the orange blossom's representation of chastity, purity, and bearing children. This custom was brought over from China to England in the early 1800's and was used by Queen Victoria in her bridal wreath. After that, entwining orange blossoms became a staple part of bridal wreaths and was even said so in very influential etiquette journals of the 19th century. Due to this high demand of orange blossoms, wax replicas of the Florida state flower were used instead.

If you are planning to buy honey for its health-benefits, it must be raw honey. Heating honey (pasteurization) destroys the all of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals, and aromatics. Honey that has been heated and filtered is called commercial, regular or liquid honey.

The reason some honey is heated is that the majority of Americans prefer the convenience of being able to spoon, pour or squeeze honey from a bottle onto their cereal or into their tea.

In addition, commercial honey is clearer, easier to measure or spread than raw honey and many people think that honey that has crystallized is spoiled so they discard it. Honey that has been heated and filtered will not crystallize as fast as raw honey.

Although the Mohawk Valley Trading Company specializes in raw honey, they also offer liquid honey for those who prefer it.

Their raw honey is not heated, filtered, blended or processed. All of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals and aromatics are in the same condition as they were in the hive.

Honey has been used by humans since ancient times for its health benefits and as a sweetener and flavoring for many foods and beverages with tea being the most popular.. The flavor and color of honey is determined by the type of flower the bees gather the nectar from. Dark colored honey is considered to be higher in minerals and antioxidants than light colored honey and one of the most well known dark colored honeys is buckwheat honey. Raw buckwheat honey contains a higher amount of minerals and an antioxidant called polyphenol, which gives it its dark color.

Honey is a healthy alternative to refined sugar, however when cooking or baking with honey, it is not necessary to use raw honey since the heat destroys the all of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals, and aromatics. Since the flavor and color of honey is determined by the type of flower the bees gather the nectar from, it is a good idea to taste the honey before using it in a recipe. For example; a dark honey like buckwheat honey will result in a strong, heavy, a pungent flavor, whereas orange blossom honey will result in a delicate orange flavor.

When substituting honey for sugar in a recipe, use about ¾ cup honey in place of 1 cup sugar, and reduce the any liquid ingredients by about 2 tablespoons. Honey is acidic so unless the recipe includes sour cream or buttermilk, add a pinch of baking soda to neutralize the acidity. Baked goods made with honey will brown more quickly so when substituting honey for sugar in a recipe reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees. Honey is hygroscopic meaning it attracts water to itself; therefore baked goods made with honey will absorb moisture from the air and become soft over time.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prwebhoney-raw-orange-blossom/10/prweb9977476.htm

 

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