Market Overview

Millimeter sized mechanisms, optoelectronic chips and infrared photodetectors, Toyohashi Tech e-Newsletter features a diversity of research projects

Millimeter sized mechanisms, optoelectronic chips and infrared photodetectors, Toyohashi Tech e-Newsletter features a diversity of research projects

This week, Toyohashi University of Technology publishes the March issue of ‘Toyohashi Tech e-Newsletter', which includes highlights of some of the top papers from researchers at the university. Featured in these highlights are reports of the world's first one-bit digital counter on a single chip, and an innovative new millimeter sized microactuator. The on-line e-Newsletter includes further news and views from one of Japan's most dynamic science and technology based universities, including a focus on an infrared photodetector that exploits ‘plasmon resonance' on the surface of gold nanorods.

(Vocus/PRWEB) 22 March 2011

This week, Toyohashi University of Technology publishes the March issue of ‘Toyohashi Tech e-Newsletter', which includes highlights of some of the top papers from researchers at the university. Featured in these highlights are reports of the world's first one-bit digital counter on a single chip, and an innovative new millimeter sized microactuator. The on-line e-Newsletter includes further news and views from one of Japan's most dynamic science and technology based universities, including a focus on an infrared photodetector that exploits ‘plasmon resonance' on the surface of gold nanorods.

The ‘Research Highlights' section offers easy to understand summaries of research papers, and can be found at: http://www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/research_highlights/index.html. The following topics are featured:

Optoelectronic integrated circuits: Silicon and nitride LEDs integrated onto a single chip for one-bit digital counters

The use of silicon in photonic devices, such as LEDs and lasers, has been problematic due to the fact that silicon has an indirect bandgap. Now, a team of researchers has overcome this problem by combining silicon devices with direct bandgap semiconductors to successfully produce the first realization of an optoelectronic integrated circuit that is a one-bit digital counter.

Innovative microactuators: Compact 3.5 mm cubic rotary-linear piezoelectric actuator

Tomoaki Mashimo has overcome the difficulties in producing millimeter sized microactuators by developing a device that can deliver reliable torque and thrust for applications in microelectromechanical systems, micro-medical devices and microrobotics. The miniaturization was achieved due to the simplicity of the design. “The microactuator's simple design lends itself to many other applications as well” says Mashimo.

Health and environment: New microorganisms for cleaning up PCB contamination

Using specialized bacteria, researchers have developed a bioremediation method for reducing the harmful effects of a group of pollutants called polychlorinated biphenyls. By modifying the existing microorganism Dehalobacter the team was able to increase the limited range of pollutants which the microorganism can effectively act upon.

Coating technology: Interaction of free falling copper droplets with heated substrates

The physical mechanisms underlying interactions between the surfaces of materials and coatings sprayed onto them are poorly understood. To clarify these mechanisms, researchers from the Department of Mechanical Engineering have analyzed what happens when millimeter sized drops of molten copper are applied to a surface by the so-called ‘splat process' under a range of conditions.

Neuroscience: Blue in the face

In studying the way we perceive other human faces, much research has been carried out into how facial configuration effects both ‘N170' neural responses to facial stimuli as well as ‘gamma band' oscillations in the brain. In a new study, researchers have examined the role of colour in facial perception, finding that blue faces elicit a greater N170 response but have no effect on gamma band oscillations.

Toyohashi Tech inventions and inventors come under the spotlight in the section ‘Tech-Overtures'. This time, an innovative infrared photodetector exploiting ‘plasmon resonance' at the surface of the gold nanorods is explained. Such technology can be used for high efficiency infra-red photodetectors for optical communications systems:

http://www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/tech_overtures/index.html


Other features of Toyohashi Tech e-Newsletter include:

  •     A report on the ‘International Symposium on Quality Assurance and International Standards of Engineering Education' held on 18 January 2011 with a variety of EU delegates.

  •     An interview with members of the Tenure Track program. These are young interdisciplinary researchers at the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) covering topics including nano-photonics, magneto-optic biochemical, and bio-mimicking systems.
  •     Events and activities of the University such as:
  • o    A report and video of the highly eventful robotics competition

    o    Members of the Auto Club describe how they design and build high performance racing cars

    o    Videos of the famous hand-held fireworks festival held in Toyohashi in July

    o    A report and video of the ‘World Sports Festival'

    All features in the news letter can be accessed at http://www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/index.html.

    Further information:

    Adarsh Sandhu

    Professor and Chief Scientist at the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute

    Head of International Media Relations

    E-mail: sandhu(at)eiiris(dot)tut(dot)ac(dot)jp

    Tel/Fax: 81-532-81-5142

    About Toyohashi University of Technology:

    Founded in 1976, Toyohashi University of Technology is a vibrant modern institute with research activities reflecting the modern era of advanced electronics, engineering, and life sciences.

    Website: http://www.tut.ac.jp/english/


    About the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS):

    EIIRIS is Toyohashi Tech's new flagship research complex launched on 1st October 2010. "The aim of EIIRIS is to produce world-class innovative research," says President Yoshiyuki Sakaki. "To do this we are bringing together ambitious young researchers from diverse fields to collaborate on pioneering new frontiers in science such as brain/neuro-electronics as well as tackling some of the major issues mankind faces today: issues such as environmental changes and aging societies."

    Website: http://www.eiiris.tut.ac.jp/index.html.

    ###

    For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prwebtoyohashitech/enewsletter/prweb8226450.htm

     

    Around the Web, We're Loving...

    Partner Network

    Get Benzinga's Newsletters